Business, Management and Team Process/Team Technical Webinar Series

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Welcome to two new webinar series from Net Objectives

These series are to help people of all roles regardless of their level of Lean-Agile adoption. Each webinar focuses on one specific Lean-Agile related question. The Business, Management and Team Process Series is geared towards executives, business stakeholders, management and the process aspects of a team. The Team Technical Series is geared towards what you need to do to write solid code with high quality designs while keeping technical debt to an effective minimum.

Business, Management and Team Process Series

This series is designed to give an overview of all of the major Agile development practices – Lean, Kanban, and Scrum. It focuses on their use on all but the smallest scales. Topics include:

  • The Basics of Agile Software Development
  • An Introduction to Kanban for Your Team and Organization
  • Lean-Agile Software Development: Where to Start
  • The Four Reasons Only 32% of Software Development Projects Will Succeed this Year
  • Scaling Agile with Multiple Teams formerly Why Scrum is a Great Team Process and Why You Need Lean to Scale

Team Technical Series

This series is designed to give an overview of all of the major Agile development practices – Lean, Kanban, and Scrum. It focuses on their use on all but the smallest scales. Topics include: Essential Skills for the Agile Developer
  • Essential Skills for the Agile Developer
  • Acceptance Test-Driven Development: An Early Lean-Agile Adoption Practice
  • Software Design in the Agile Age
  • The Importance of Short Stories
  • Capturing Business Rules In Stories
    Date|Time|Presenter|RecordingTitle|Description
    Given
    Oct 27, 2011
    9am-10am PDT

    Alan Shalloway
    Recording
    1 PDU Category B
    The Basics of Agile Software Development
    This webinar is for those who want to understand what Agile software development is about but do not have any experience with it. You will learn:
    • The business case for Agile software development
    • How Agile methods can improve the bottom line
    • Why Agile projects are less risky
    • The essence of Agile software development
    • The different approaches to agility
    Given
    Nov 10, 2011
    9am-10am PST

    Scott Bain
    Recording
    Essential Skills for the Agile Developer
    This webinar is for Agile developers who want to improve their design and coding methods as well as those who are just undertaking Agile and feel they need some help designing and coding in an Agile environment. You will learn:
    • How to avoid making decisions prematurely
    • How to pragmatically avoid duplication
    • How to write code that can be changed without creating lots of problems
    Given
    Nov 22, 2011
    8am-9:30am PST

    Alan Shalloway
    Recording
    Redirected to fill out short form for access
    1 PDU Category B
    An Introduction to Kanban for Your Team and Organization
    This webinar presents Kanban as a method to introduce change into organizations and as an approach to understand the basics of product development flow.
    Given
    Dec 2, 2011
    8am-9:30am PST

    Alan Shalloway
    Recording
    Small fee for purchase
    1 PDU Category B
    Lean-Agile Software Development: Where to Start
    Too many people think "going agile" means to start with a Scrum pilot project and then attempt to scale its success. This, unfortunately, usually leads to stagnation after initial success. This webinar provides valuable insights for those who are about to begin the transition to Agile software development or who are expanding current efforts. It begins by discussing the questions you must ask before making a decision on where and how to start. These relate to the size and structure of the organization as well as who is driving the transition. Considerations such as level of technical debt, team dependencies and the ability to create cross-functional teams is also discussed. After explaining why all of these issues are important, Alan discusses how to use the knowledge of your organization's challenges and ability to change to decide where you can best start to have a sustainable Agile transition.
    Given
    Dec 8, 2011
    9am-10am PST

    Amir Kolsky
    Recording
    Acceptance Test-Driven Development: An Early Lean-Agile Adoption Practice
    This webinar introduces Acceptance Test-Driven Development (ATDD), an essential practice for Lean-Agile software development. You will learn:
    • The ATDD process
    • How ATDD supports Lean-Agile software development
    • The changes in operations required to make it work
    The benefits of ATDD include:
    • Exact and complete specifications
    • Agreement and understanding on the work to be done
    • Complete test specifications
    • Exact indication of completion of work
    Given
    Jan 10, 2012
    9am-10am PST

    Alan Shalloway
    Recording
    1 PDU Category B

    The Four Reasons Only 32% of Software Development Projects Will Succeed this Year
    This webinar explores why so many software development projects fail. Unfortunately, most Agile methods do not address these reasons very well. To ensure success, you need to extend your methods to include the following:

    1. Project selection
    2. Taking a holistic view
    3. Attending to your company's culture
    4. Knowing when to abort

    Many in the software industry are looking to Agile methods to address software development failures. Unfortunately, it is critical to ensure that whatever methods are adopted address the cause of these failures.

    Given
    Jan 31, 2012
    9am-10am PST
    Amir Kolsky

    Recording
    The Importance of Short Stories
    This webinar is for Lean-Agile teams who want to understand what makes for effective stories, how to write them, and how big they should be. You will learn:
    • The role stories play and clarify some of the confusion around the term
    • The story writing process and how it relates to acceptance testing
    • The importance of keeping the stories short
    Given
    Feb 13, 2012
    9am-10am PST

    Alan Shalloway
    Recording
    1 PDU Category B
    Scaling Agile with Multiple Teams formerly Why Scrum is a Great Team Process and Why You Need Lean to Scale
    There is no question that Scrum is a great process and it has helped many organizations. Why do so many teams adopting Scrum have challenges getting it to Scale. This webinar discusses what makes Scrum good and what you must add if you are going to get a Lean-Agile business process across more than a couple of teams. You will learn why:
    • A team-centric approach is not enough for business-wide agility
    • Management must be included in an Agile process if you want it to work for more than individual teams
    • You need more than team Agile methods to get Agile to work across teams
    Given
    Mar 1, 2012
    9am-10am PST

    Amir Kolsky
    Recording
    Software Design in the Agile Age
    Engaging in agile software development requires us to rethink what software design is. In this webinar we will examine the role and importance of design in software development, the difference between design and architecture, emergent design – the way to evolve design in agile context, and the relationship between design and TDD.
    Given
    Mar 26, 2012
    9am-10am PDT

    Amir Kolsky
    Recording
    Capturing Business Rules in Stories
    This webinar addresses the difficulty in breaking down stories to the right size while keeping the business value in mind. The solution is to focus on the business rules that are manifested in the product. The result is stories that are smaller, can be defined independently, and are less coupled. This results in:
    • A smaller number of tests to be able to completely test the system
    • Less risk that a change in one business rule will affect other business rules in an unexpected way